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Archive for the ‘Computer music’ Category

In this edition of Visual Noise a video by Amsterdam based electronic artist and software developer Fabrizio Poce.

The video was made with a Max for Live/Ableton Live application which enables him to improvise with 3D geometries as though they’re an instrument. The music to the video was provided by Dutch DJ/producer NearEarthObject:

 

 

On Fabrizio’s website you will find more intriguing video’s made with his 3D modeling software for Max for Live.

More info:

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Ran into these guys yesterday in the Glaspaviljoen at the Bizarre Sound Creatures exhibition during the magnificent Dutch Design Week 2015 in Eindhoven:

Geluidsdrug, a collective organizing biweekly electronic jam sessions in Artspace Flipside, at walking distance from my home:

Everybody can join their jam sessions in Flipside, so I am going to pay them a visit soon..

More information:

Found through the Binary Heap blog : a short 27-minute Vimeo video documentary about the British Electronic Music Studios (EMS), famous for their groundbreaking VCS3 and Synthi synthesizers.

VCS3 advert

VCS3 advert

This is the synopsis of the video: Post-war Britain rebuilt itself on a wave of scientific and industrial breakthroughs that culminated in the cultural revolution of the 1960’s. It was a period of sweeping change and experimentation where art and culture participated in and reflected the wider social changes. In this atmosphere was born the Electronic Music Studios (EMS), a radical group of avant-garde electronic musicians who utilized technology and experimentation to compose a futuristic electronic sound-scape for the New Britain. Comprising of pioneering electronic musicians Tristram Cary (famed for his work on the Dr Who series) and Peter Zinovieff, EMS’s studio was one of the most advanced computer-music facilities in the world. EMS’s great legacy is the VCS3, Britain’s first synthesizer and rival of the American Moog. The VCS3 was a uniquely British invention, which changed the sounds of some of the most popular artists of this period including Brian Eno, Hawkwind and Pink Floyd. Almost thirty years on the VCS3 is still used by modern electronic artists like Aphex Twin and Chicken Lips.

What The Future Sounded Like uncovers a group of British composers and innovators who harnessed technology and new ideas to re-imagine the boundaries of music and sound. The documentary places the emergence of EMS in the larger context of 60’s post-war Britain, with its focus on “space age” technology and the advent of the counter-culture. A must-see for everyone interested in the history of electronic music and electronic music devices! If you want to know more about EMS and their activities and products after viewing the documentary, check the 2 part article series of Sound-On-Sound on the history of EMS.

And EMS still exists! You can still buy a Synthi A or VCS3 online. Check the website of “The World’s Longest Established Synthesizer Manufacturer” for prices and ordering…

Found on the Soniccouture web site : CrowdChoir.
The Crowdchoir project was an experiment in crowd-sourcing by Soniccouture, a company specializing in sampler VSTI’s : they asked people all around the world to each sing one note from a 3 octave range. Then they layered these recordings in a sampler to create a unique vocal sound – a wash of different voices in different rooms in different countries.

CrowdChoir VSTI

The project was a great success according to Soniccouture: over 1000 people contributed to a final total that exceeded 4000 different notes.
The instrument is now finished, and can be heard and bought on the Soniccouture web site. It costs 20,- Euro and all profits from Crowdchoir sales will be donated to The Red Cross by Soniccouture.


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