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Archive for the ‘Software art’ Category

Currently on “display” at STRIJP-S in Eindhoven, the Netherlands until the end of this year: 4D GRAFFITI INVASIONS by AUJIK.

4D Graffiti Invasions is an experience/exhibition which combines  the post-industrial  environment of the Strijp-S area (formerly a Philips Electronics plant) in Eindhoven, with augmented reality (AR) “graffiti” projected onto the streets and buildings. While walking on Strijp-S, you experience a virtual layer on top of the physical environment through your smartphone. Graffiti in augmented reality (AR) can pop up anywhere on your smartphone and then disappear again. This graffiti is not a frozen image in AR, but  consists of abstract animations:

This is how it works. To be able to experience the AR graffiti you must first download the free 4D Graffiti Invasions app  from the Google Play Store (Android) or the App Store (iOS).  The app shows the location of the 4D artworks at Strijp-S. If you walk over to a site, there is sticker on the ground, which you need to scan to experience the AR graffiti piece of that particular site on your smartphone.

AUJIK is an artistic concept initiated and maintained by the Swedish artist Stefan Larsson, who is currently based in Japan. Stefan Larsson is fascinated about the idea that everything, no matter how synthetic it seems, is nature. Everything derives from nature even though we sometimes perceive it otherwise. To extend this idea he gave it an animistic character influenced by Shinto and various pagan beliefs in his AUJIK concept. AUJIK  is modelled to resemble a fictive esoteric cult. Its themes are artificial intelligence, nature, technology, perception, future speculation, neuroscience and architecture.

In AUJIK he divides nature it into Primitive (vegetation, soil, humans/animals etc.) and Refined (AI, robotic, nano-technology etc.) and creates artefacts that are crossbreeds of these nature types. The central idea of these artefacts is that everything, even the most artificial things, have consciousness and a soul. Although it can only be experienced on the tiny screen of a smartphone, the results of this concept are quite stunning as you can see in the video above. Want to experience the works of AUJIK at Strijp-S yourself? Start your tour at the AUJIK Homebase at Mu artspace. Here you will find the information about the app and all the locations of the AR works.

More information:

 

I discovered Swedish artist Jonas Lund through an interesting article in Gonzo (circus) entitled “Propaganda as a scalpel“. Jonas Lund is a Swedish artist working from Berlin and Amsterdam, who makes use and often questions (and criticizes) the current state and usage of online communications, advertising and marketing.

Terms of Service

TOS (Terms of Service) 2016, Terms of Service textual agreement

According to his online resume he “creates paintings, sculpture, photography, websites and performances that critically reflects on contemporary networked systems and power structures of control“. For this purpose he has made many installations,  websites, online games and bots, of which an overview can be found on his website. Check some of his disturbing online games and bots such as:

Being a web developer by profession from 1995 onwards, I sympathize with his efforts in this particular field of “‘critical” web/net art. After a surge in popularity and interest around 2000 it seems to have disappeared in obscurity again. Nice to see there are still artists who are dedicated to this type of tech art.

More information:

In this edition of Visual Noise a video by Amsterdam based electronic artist and software developer Fabrizio Poce.

The video was made with a Max for Live/Ableton Live application which enables him to improvise with 3D geometries as though they’re an instrument. The music to the video was provided by Dutch DJ/producer NearEarthObject:

 

 

On Fabrizio’s website you will find more intriguing video’s made with his 3D modeling software for Max for Live.

More info:

In September I was on holiday in the Baltic states (and in St. Petersburg and Moscow in Russia). In  Riga I bought a book-which-actually-is-a-magazine  called “Systems”  (edition of 500 copies, ISSN 2255-9310, Popper Publishing) dedicated to contemporary and post-internet art in the Baltics (and Russia).

One of the most interesting art works (on page 82) in this book/magazine was Untitled from Latvian artist Victor Timoveef. I became curious and visited his website where I found more interesting works, such as the computer generated Soft War images:

 

 

 

 

So who is Victor Timofeev? The bio on his website doesn’t provide much information, but he recently had a solo exhibition in the Drawing Room in London, called S.T.A.T.ESuprisingly, the Drawing Room is  “the only public and non-profit gallery in the UK and Europe dedicated to contemporary drawing”. Here some more info on the digital (?) artist can be found:

“Viktor Timofeev was born in Latvia in 1984, studied at Hunter College, New York and is currently completing his MFA at the Piet Zwart Institute in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Viktor Timofeev’s practice combines drawing, digital and sculptural work.  [He] creates installations with digitally generated imagery, interactive games and rule-based performances. He is a prolific draughtsman but also makes computer games and browser based collage puzzles without instructions.  This [digital] work runs parallel to a drawing and painting practice from which his logic and inventions spring and which are collectively grouped as S.T.A.T.E., a title conceived by Timofeev in 2013.

So there is also a Dutch connection… Being a web developer myself, I was triggered by the browser based collage puzzles without instructions part of the bioThis refers to a work called Selekthor. Selekthor is a looping collage-based puzzle without instructions written in native Javascript, originally hosted at minerpie.net, but now embedded in his website. If you click on one of the images below, the web page with the puzzle is opened:

     

 

You didn’t click? Here is a video demo of the puzzle, which might make you change your mind:

Timofeev also participated in the thelimitedcollection on Tumblr, a collection of animated gifs made by various digital artists:

 

 

So a very interesting Latvian artist to follow whose work ranges from drawings to javascripts. Check these links to find out more:

Every technology has its own accidents. Rosa Menkman is a Dutch media artist who focuses on visual artifacts created by these kind of accidents in digital media. The visuals and installations she creates are the result of glitches, compressions, feedback and other forms of unplanned noise.

Although most people perceive accidents as negative experiences, Rosa Menkman emphasizes their positive consequences. By combining both her practical as well as academic background, she merges her abstract pieces within a grand theory (“glitch studies”), in which she strives for new forms of conceptual synthesis of the two.

Glitch art seems to be an art form which requires a considerable amount of – rather obscure – explanation. According to Menkman, “glitch art is best described as a collection of forms and events that oscillate between extremes: the fragile, technologically based moment(um) of a material break, the conceptual or techno-cultural investigation of breakages, and the accepted and standardised commodity that a glitch can become. […] Glitch genres perform reflections on materiality not just on a technological level, but also by playing off the physical medium and its non-physical, interpretative or conceptual characteristics. To understand a work […] of glitch art completely, each level of this notion of (glitch) materiality should be studied: the text as a physical artifact, its technological and aesthetical qualities, conceptual content, and the interpretive activities of artists”.
and audiences.

If this description confuses you: it is  – more or less! – explained by Rosa when interviewed for the Digital Manifesto Archive:

So much for theory. How does this actually look and/or sound? Below are a few video’s included of works made by Rosa Menkman.

 

Pattern Recognition, Beyond Resolution

This video was apparently commissioned by the Dutch railways to be played on big LED ‘Urban Screens’ in train stations all over the Netherlands. However, when finished it wasn’t used because it was classified by the railway company as being “to strange for train passengers”:

 

DCT:SYPHONING

This installation is part of the Transfer Download exhibition of the Minnesota Street Project in Transfer Gallery in  San Francisco, which ends on September 9, so next week. So you are actually still able to see/experience it if you are living near SF!

According to the Transfer Gallery website this work is inspired by the 1884 novel ‘Flatland’ by Edwin Abbott Abbott. Rosa Menkman tells the story of a father who introduces his son to different levels of compression; they move from dither, to lines, to macroblocks (the realm in which they normally resonate) to the ‘future’ realms of wavelets and vectors.

 

Xilitla

Xilitla is a software game/application for Windows, Mac and Linux platforms which enables you to view the videoscapes of Rosa Menkman in glitchy  way outside the confines of YouTube and Vimeo (or this  blog page..). The app can  be downloaded for free on the Xilitla/Beyond Resolution website. In the About Xilitla video below she explains the goal and concept behind the app:

 

 

All in all, a very interesting Dutch media artist,who combines art theory and practice in her work and has in doing so already produced an extensive body of media art pieces around the concept of “glitch”. Below are some links – in random order, of course – to get you viewing, playing and reading:

More info:

Tonight the STRP Biennale 2015 will start in the Klokgebouw on Strijp-S in Eindhoven. The STRP biennial brings together art, technology and experimental pop culture and connects them to interested audiences. With its interactive art, light art, robotics, performances, experimental music and films, lectures and workshops STRP offers a glimpse into the near and sometimes distant future of our technology-driven culture. The topic of this edition is “SCREEN ON | NO SCREEN”:  the electronic screen. As is described on the STRP website:

.Screens are all around us, and they’re not only becoming bigger, smarter and more interactive, but also thinner, sharper and more flexible. The STRP Biennial 2015 investigates the thin line between the material and immaterial image. We show how our relation with the images that are moving all around us is getting more and more complex. It’s getting very hard to separate ourselves from them, sometimes we immerse ourselves in them, but at the same time we are getting better at controlling the images.”

 

The festival opens with a performance by Robert Henke (a.k.a Monolake, a regular participant at the STRP festival). He will show an updated version of his Lumiere audio-visual performance, simply called Lumiere II. I will be there to attend it. Four specially crafted lasers are linked to the world-famous Ableton DAW software, that was co-developed by Henke, to create animated patterns aligned to sounds with it.  The video above contains an excerpt of the original Lumiere laser performance.

Be sure to visit STRP 2015 too, if you are interested in cutting edge tech art and are near Eindhoven.

More info:

Seaquence is an experiment in musical composition. Adopting a biological metaphor, you can create and combine musical lifeforms (on the website – nnnoises) resulting in an organic, dynamic composition. You can save and share your composition in the website.

Screenshot 2013-12-08_2

More information:


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