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Archive for the ‘Media art’ Category

Currenty at Mu Artspace in Eindhoven, The Netherlands: the exhibition “Back End” by Dries Depoorter.

Back End exhibition

Dries Depoorter is a Belgian media artist and a freelance concept provider.  He has a background in electronics and studied Media Arts in Ghent, Belgium. His work is focused on the internet, especially on topics such as online privacy, identity and surveillance:

In Back End Depoorter shows how boundaries can be dissolved with a few simple interventions. How human creativity and machine learning, private and public, entertainment and morality all blend together online. Anything can be linked and the actual connections are visible in the exhibition ; the cables, the plugs, the way the software works. Depoorter’s play with technology, access and data analysis creates a sense of unease.

Ten recent and new works are on show at Mu, among them Jaywalking. Jaywalking, shows live streams from traffic cameras at intersections with pedestrian crossing lights. When someone unsuspectingly crosses the red light, the installation offers the viewer the opportunity to let know the police: one push of a button sends an email with a screenshot of the violation to the nearest police station. Jaywalking Frames exists of an entire wall filled with these screenshots, except that these were generated with the aid of automated image analysis. The prints can be purchased for the cost of the fine which the buyer would receive in the country where the violation was captured:

Jaywaking FRame photo installation

Depoorter depicts this and other works in the exhibition as both critical and funny: “you can say they are critical… and, well, I think they are not entirely without humour”. That seems spot on to me, so don’t forget to visit this exhibition if you are anything near Eindhoven, NL. The exhibition runs until September, 23.

More information:

I discovered Swedish artist Jonas Lund through an interesting article in Gonzo (circus) entitled “Propaganda as a scalpel“. Jonas Lund is a Swedish artist working from Berlin and Amsterdam, who makes use and often questions (and criticizes) the current state and usage of online communications, advertising and marketing.

Terms of Service

TOS (Terms of Service) 2016, Terms of Service textual agreement

According to his online resume he “creates paintings, sculpture, photography, websites and performances that critically reflects on contemporary networked systems and power structures of control“. For this purpose he has made many installations,  websites, online games and bots, of which an overview can be found on his website. Check some of his disturbing online games and bots such as:

Being a web developer by profession from 1995 onwards, I sympathize with his efforts in this particular field of “‘critical” web/net art. After a surge in popularity and interest around 2000 it seems to have disappeared in obscurity again. Nice to see there are still artists who are dedicated to this type of tech art.

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Yesterday I visited the solo exhibition Future Bodies of Bart Hess at the Stedelijk Museum ‘s-Hertogenbosch.

Bart Hess is a young Dutch artist/designer who shot to fame with his Slime Dress for Lady Gaga in 2011. Crossing boundaries between design, fashion and art, his oeuvre is a series of studies into materiality, (virtual) reality and technology. He is fascinated by the human body, which he tends to cloak in ways that have little to do with styling or fashion and more with performance art and science fiction. High-tech materials seem to merge with the skin of the models he uses for his studies. In the last ten years he has moved from recording his work in video or photography towards more theatrical pieces that want to engage and envelop the viewer in a new kind of reality.

Punk: Pins and Needles is a video by Ruth Hogben and Bart Hess, presented by fashion film platform ShowStudio and included in the Future Bodies exhibition:

 

To learn more about the works of Bart Hess check this video in the Dutch Profiles series on YouTube on Dutch designers:

 

More information:

Telcosystems are a collaboration of multimedia artists, which are based in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. In their audiovisual works Telcosystems research the relation between the behavior of programmed logic and the human perception of this behavior; they aim in their work at an integration of human expression and programmed machine behavior. This  results in the audiovisual installations they make, in films, videos, soundtracks, prints and in live performances.

They have released a very remarkable audiovisual work:… a book called Resonanz . Instead of the usual audio/video stream combination in audiovisual art works presented in the Visual noise series, this book combines 12 sound compositions with 12 computer generated images printed in the book. You can plug a headphone into the book, to hear the sound piece belonging to an image printed on spread pages of the book. Sound and image of a page were generated by the same electronic signal, so you experience a resemblance between the two. This combined provides the audiovisual experience of the piece:

 

 

The book was on display in the Klokgebouw exhibition during the last Dutch Design Week held in Eindhoven last year. And you can buy the book in two limited editions of 200 copies each for 245,- or 395,- euros on the Telcosytems website. This is too expensive for me, so i’ll stick with the video of the book displayed above. However, the combination between printed images and sounds in such a familiar book format as an audiovisual art piece, was worth a mention in this tech art blog.

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In this edition of Visual Noise a video by Amsterdam based electronic artist and software developer Fabrizio Poce.

The video was made with a Max for Live/Ableton Live application which enables him to improvise with 3D geometries as though they’re an instrument. The music to the video was provided by Dutch DJ/producer NearEarthObject:

 

 

On Fabrizio’s website you will find more intriguing video’s made with his 3D modeling software for Max for Live.

More info:

This time a video in this series with more conventional visuals than usual: “Leyohmi“by  German theremin player Carolina Eyck and the American Contemporary Music Ensemble.

I have added it because I like the beautiful nature scenes of the video, the thin theremin sounds of Carolina Eyck and the general atmosphere of the video. They seem to fit a Sunday morning:

 

Carolina Eyck is a contemporary master of the theremin, together with Dorit Chrysler and Lydia Kavina. I do have a Moog theremin(i) myself, but it is just one of the many synthesizers in my studio. So I am not as proficient in playing it as those theremin maestros, but know how hard it is to play the thing.  If you like the sounds of this video, I advise you to check them out on YouTube or elsewhere on the web:

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I visited GLOW 2016 yesterday evening. GLOW is an international “light in art and architecture” event held every year in november in my home town, Eindhoven (NL). The event grows bigger  every year. This year it consists of 2 walks: The City walk and the Science walk. Together a 7.5 km hike with light art installation in open air.

Yesterday I did the 4 km City walk, tonight I plan to do the Science walk if weather permits it. The Science walk is through the TU/e Technical University area.

GLOW 2016 has some amazing cutting-edge light art  installations. The video below of Steftiaan Video Producties contains an overview of most of the works on display of this edition:

Highlights of the City walk from my perspective were Axioma from Onionlab at the Stadhuisplein and Flux Appartition: Moving through perception and illusion by 250K, Dynamo, Eyesupply,  The Art of Light and performer Jing Wang.

Flux Appartition might be the best GLOW piece yet! It is a mix of 3D light projections, in a Hologram-ic way (or is it a real dancer?), with music and urban dance into one, compelling, energetic piece of art. The videos below give you an impression of the performance:

The town hall of Eindhoven usually is a very bland 1970’s building. However, the Spanish audiovisual studio Onionlab managed to  turn it into an exiting dynamic experience by projecting a film on it which could be viewed in 3D with the help of a pair of 1 euro cardboard stereoscopic glasses:

And this was only part GLOW 2016, included in the City walk! Can’t wait to see the second part of GLOW 2016 in the Science walk..

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