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Archive for the ‘Videos’ Category

Yesterday I visited the solo exhibition Future Bodies of Bart Hess at the Stedelijk Museum ‘s-Hertogenbosch.

Bart Hess is a young Dutch artist/designer who shot to fame with his Slime Dress for Lady Gaga in 2011. Crossing boundaries between design, fashion and art, his oeuvre is a series of studies into materiality, (virtual) reality and technology. He is fascinated by the human body, which he tends to cloak in ways that have little to do with styling or fashion and more with performance art and science fiction. High-tech materials seem to merge with the skin of the models he uses for his studies. In the last ten years he has moved from recording his work in video or photography towards more theatrical pieces that want to engage and envelop the viewer in a new kind of reality.

Punk: Pins and Needles is a video by Ruth Hogben and Bart Hess, presented by fashion film platform ShowStudio and included in the Future Bodies exhibition:

 

To learn more about the works of Bart Hess check this video in the Dutch Profiles series on YouTube on Dutch designers:

 

More information:

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In this edition of Visual Noise a video by Amsterdam based electronic artist and software developer Fabrizio Poce.

The video was made with a Max for Live/Ableton Live application which enables him to improvise with 3D geometries as though they’re an instrument. The music to the video was provided by Dutch DJ/producer NearEarthObject:

 

 

On Fabrizio’s website you will find more intriguing video’s made with his 3D modeling software for Max for Live.

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This time a video in this series with more conventional visuals than usual: “Leyohmi“by  German theremin player Carolina Eyck and the American Contemporary Music Ensemble.

I have added it because I like the beautiful nature scenes of the video, the thin theremin sounds of Carolina Eyck and the general atmosphere of the video. They seem to fit a Sunday morning:

 

Carolina Eyck is a contemporary master of the theremin, together with Dorit Chrysler and Lydia Kavina. I do have a Moog theremin(i) myself, but it is just one of the many synthesizers in my studio. So I am not as proficient in playing it as those theremin maestros, but know how hard it is to play the thing.  If you like the sounds of this video, I advise you to check them out on YouTube or elsewhere on the web:

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I visited GLOW 2016 yesterday evening. GLOW is an international “light in art and architecture” event held every year in november in my home town, Eindhoven (NL). The event grows bigger  every year. This year it consists of 2 walks: The City walk and the Science walk. Together a 7.5 km hike with light art installation in open air.

Yesterday I did the 4 km City walk, tonight I plan to do the Science walk if weather permits it. The Science walk is through the TU/e Technical University area.

GLOW 2016 has some amazing cutting-edge light art  installations. The video below of Steftiaan Video Producties contains an overview of most of the works on display of this edition:

Highlights of the City walk from my perspective were Axioma from Onionlab at the Stadhuisplein and Flux Appartition: Moving through perception and illusion by 250K, Dynamo, Eyesupply,  The Art of Light and performer Jing Wang.

Flux Appartition might be the best GLOW piece yet! It is a mix of 3D light projections, in a Hologram-ic way (or is it a real dancer?), with music and urban dance into one, compelling, energetic piece of art. The videos below give you an impression of the performance:

The town hall of Eindhoven usually is a very bland 1970’s building. However, the Spanish audiovisual studio Onionlab managed to  turn it into an exiting dynamic experience by projecting a film on it which could be viewed in 3D with the help of a pair of 1 euro cardboard stereoscopic glasses:

And this was only part GLOW 2016, included in the City walk! Can’t wait to see the second part of GLOW 2016 in the Science walk..

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Two weeks ago I bought a very nice book on Belgian multimedia artist Anne Mie van Kerkckhoven’s work at a book discount fair. Yesterday I discovered that she currently has a major exhibition entitled What would I do in Orbit? at Museum Abteiberg in Monchen-Gladbach (Germany), one of my favorite modern art museums.

Coincidences? I don’t think so. So it is time to put the focus on her and her work in this tech art blog with this old video fragment from V2 from 1988 (or 1990?):

Mental Rotation: L’Age d’Or 2 is a video installation, shown at V2_ in 1990, part of the exhibition of the second Manifestation for the Unstable Media. The video was included in the V2_ Compilation for Early Electronic Art I.

BTW: Anne Mie’s website contains over 80 of her videos and films. Pay it a visit!.

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Every technology has its own accidents. Rosa Menkman is a Dutch media artist who focuses on visual artifacts created by these kind of accidents in digital media. The visuals and installations she creates are the result of glitches, compressions, feedback and other forms of unplanned noise.

Although most people perceive accidents as negative experiences, Rosa Menkman emphasizes their positive consequences. By combining both her practical as well as academic background, she merges her abstract pieces within a grand theory (“glitch studies”), in which she strives for new forms of conceptual synthesis of the two.

Glitch art seems to be an art form which requires a considerable amount of – rather obscure – explanation. According to Menkman, “glitch art is best described as a collection of forms and events that oscillate between extremes: the fragile, technologically based moment(um) of a material break, the conceptual or techno-cultural investigation of breakages, and the accepted and standardised commodity that a glitch can become. […] Glitch genres perform reflections on materiality not just on a technological level, but also by playing off the physical medium and its non-physical, interpretative or conceptual characteristics. To understand a work […] of glitch art completely, each level of this notion of (glitch) materiality should be studied: the text as a physical artifact, its technological and aesthetical qualities, conceptual content, and the interpretive activities of artists”.
and audiences.

If this description confuses you: it is  – more or less! – explained by Rosa when interviewed for the Digital Manifesto Archive:

So much for theory. How does this actually look and/or sound? Below are a few video’s included of works made by Rosa Menkman.

 

Pattern Recognition, Beyond Resolution

This video was apparently commissioned by the Dutch railways to be played on big LED ‘Urban Screens’ in train stations all over the Netherlands. However, when finished it wasn’t used because it was classified by the railway company as being “to strange for train passengers”:

 

DCT:SYPHONING

This installation is part of the Transfer Download exhibition of the Minnesota Street Project in Transfer Gallery in  San Francisco, which ends on September 9, so next week. So you are actually still able to see/experience it if you are living near SF!

According to the Transfer Gallery website this work is inspired by the 1884 novel ‘Flatland’ by Edwin Abbott Abbott. Rosa Menkman tells the story of a father who introduces his son to different levels of compression; they move from dither, to lines, to macroblocks (the realm in which they normally resonate) to the ‘future’ realms of wavelets and vectors.

 

Xilitla

Xilitla is a software game/application for Windows, Mac and Linux platforms which enables you to view the videoscapes of Rosa Menkman in glitchy  way outside the confines of YouTube and Vimeo (or this  blog page..). The app can  be downloaded for free on the Xilitla/Beyond Resolution website. In the About Xilitla video below she explains the goal and concept behind the app:

 

 

All in all, a very interesting Dutch media artist,who combines art theory and practice in her work and has in doing so already produced an extensive body of media art pieces around the concept of “glitch”. Below are some links – in random order, of course – to get you viewing, playing and reading:

More info:

Found on ArtTube.nl: a very interesting documentary (in Dutch, but with English subtitles) about the issues of preserving digital and software driven art works over time.

As these art works are software or make use of software, they age very fast because computers, storage media, operating systems and programming languages develop rapidly. This poses a challenge for museums who buy these art works. The documentary illustrates this problem by discussing the preservation of works of artist Peter Struycken, the Dutch pioneer of 20th century digital art, whose works have been acquired by most Dutch contemporary art museums. An excellent opportunity to get acquainted with this important Dutch artist and some of these Dutch art museums:

 

 

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