nnnoises.com

Author Archive

Yesterday I visited the solo exhibition Future Bodies of Bart Hess at the Stedelijk Museum ‘s-Hertogenbosch.

Bart Hess is a young Dutch artist/designer who shot to fame with his Slime Dress for Lady Gaga in 2011. Crossing boundaries between design, fashion and art, his oeuvre is a series of studies into materiality, (virtual) reality and technology. He is fascinated by the human body, which he tends to cloak in ways that have little to do with styling or fashion and more with performance art and science fiction. High-tech materials seem to merge with the skin of the models he uses for his studies. In the last ten years he has moved from recording his work in video or photography towards more theatrical pieces that want to engage and envelop the viewer in a new kind of reality.

Punk: Pins and Needles is a video by Ruth Hogben and Bart Hess, presented by fashion film platform ShowStudio and included in the Future Bodies exhibition:

 

To learn more about the works of Bart Hess check this video in the Dutch Profiles series on YouTube on Dutch designers:

 

More information:

Advertisements

Telcosystems are a collaboration of multimedia artists, which are based in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. In their audiovisual works Telcosystems research the relation between the behavior of programmed logic and the human perception of this behavior; they aim in their work at an integration of human expression and programmed machine behavior. This  results in the audiovisual installations they make, in films, videos, soundtracks, prints and in live performances.

They have released a very remarkable audiovisual work:… a book called Resonanz . Instead of the usual audio/video stream combination in audiovisual art works presented in the Visual noise series, this book combines 12 sound compositions with 12 computer generated images printed in the book. You can plug a headphone into the book, to hear the sound piece belonging to an image printed on spread pages of the book. Sound and image of a page were generated by the same electronic signal, so you experience a resemblance between the two. This combined provides the audiovisual experience of the piece:

 

 

The book was on display in the Klokgebouw exhibition during the last Dutch Design Week held in Eindhoven last year. And you can buy the book in two limited editions of 200 copies each for 245,- or 395,- euros on the Telcosytems website. This is too expensive for me, so i’ll stick with the video of the book displayed above. However, the combination between printed images and sounds in such a familiar book format as an audiovisual art piece, was worth a mention in this tech art blog.

More information

 

  • In: Uncategorized
  • Comments Off on Reblogged: In the studio with Robert Henke

This post was reblogged from the Headphone Commute blog:

Let’s start at the very beginning. Can you tell us how you got involved in composing, and what was your very first piece of gear? I discovered the ‘Oxygene’ album by Jean Michel Jarre w…

Source: In the studio with Robert Henke

In this edition of Visual Noise a video by Amsterdam based electronic artist and software developer Fabrizio Poce.

The video was made with a Max for Live/Ableton Live application which enables him to improvise with 3D geometries as though they’re an instrument. The music to the video was provided by Dutch DJ/producer NearEarthObject:

 

 

On Fabrizio’s website you will find more intriguing video’s made with his 3D modeling software for Max for Live.

More info:

This time a video in this series with more conventional visuals than usual: “Leyohmi“by  German theremin player Carolina Eyck and the American Contemporary Music Ensemble.

I have added it because I like the beautiful nature scenes of the video, the thin theremin sounds of Carolina Eyck and the general atmosphere of the video. They seem to fit a Sunday morning:

 

Carolina Eyck is a contemporary master of the theremin, together with Dorit Chrysler and Lydia Kavina. I do have a Moog theremin(i) myself, but it is just one of the many synthesizers in my studio. So I am not as proficient in playing it as those theremin maestros, but know how hard it is to play the thing.  If you like the sounds of this video, I advise you to check them out on YouTube or elsewhere on the web:

More info:

I visited GLOW 2016 yesterday evening. GLOW is an international “light in art and architecture” event held every year in november in my home town, Eindhoven (NL). The event grows bigger  every year. This year it consists of 2 walks: The City walk and the Science walk. Together a 7.5 km hike with light art installation in open air.

Yesterday I did the 4 km City walk, tonight I plan to do the Science walk if weather permits it. The Science walk is through the TU/e Technical University area.

GLOW 2016 has some amazing cutting-edge light art  installations. The video below of Steftiaan Video Producties contains an overview of most of the works on display of this edition:

Highlights of the City walk from my perspective were Axioma from Onionlab at the Stadhuisplein and Flux Appartition: Moving through perception and illusion by 250K, Dynamo, Eyesupply,  The Art of Light and performer Jing Wang.

Flux Appartition might be the best GLOW piece yet! It is a mix of 3D light projections, in a Hologram-ic way (or is it a real dancer?), with music and urban dance into one, compelling, energetic piece of art. The videos below give you an impression of the performance:

The town hall of Eindhoven usually is a very bland 1970’s building. However, the Spanish audiovisual studio Onionlab managed to  turn it into an exiting dynamic experience by projecting a film on it which could be viewed in 3D with the help of a pair of 1 euro cardboard stereoscopic glasses:

And this was only part GLOW 2016, included in the City walk! Can’t wait to see the second part of GLOW 2016 in the Science walk..

More information

Reblogged from the excellent Binary Heap blog: this elaborate post on the history of sound art from the beginning of the 20th centruty until today:

Binary Heap

Over the past few years, sound art has been more visible in America. The Whitney has been including it in its Biennials and it even had its own section in their “The American Century” retrospective a few years ago. As a matter of fact all over the country, it’s not too unusual to walk into a museum, art gallery, or university-sponsored exhibition space and hear nothing but sound. Websites like my own UbuWeb, the San Francisco-based Other Minds, and numerous independent sites of American composers are sprouting up, offering dozens of hours worth of sound art MP3s for free. Once relegated to specialty shops like Printed Matter, Inc. even record stores seem to be carrying these sort of discs. If you’re interested in sound art, a trip to Other Music in New York City or to the new airplane-hanger sized Amoeba in Los Angeles will prove fruitful, with…

View original post 7,575 more words


Select category

Archive calendar

October 2017
S M T W T F S
« Jul    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 61 other followers