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This post was reblogged from the Headphone Commute blog:

Let’s start at the very beginning. Can you tell us how you got involved in composing, and what was your very first piece of gear? I discovered the ‘Oxygene’ album by Jean Michel Jarre w…

Source: In the studio with Robert Henke

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Reblogged from the excellent Binary Heap blog: this elaborate post on the history of sound art from the beginning of the 20th centruty until today:

Binary Heap

Over the past few years, sound art has been more visible in America. The Whitney has been including it in its Biennials and it even had its own section in their “The American Century” retrospective a few years ago. As a matter of fact all over the country, it’s not too unusual to walk into a museum, art gallery, or university-sponsored exhibition space and hear nothing but sound. Websites like my own UbuWeb, the San Francisco-based Other Minds, and numerous independent sites of American composers are sprouting up, offering dozens of hours worth of sound art MP3s for free. Once relegated to specialty shops like Printed Matter, Inc. even record stores seem to be carrying these sort of discs. If you’re interested in sound art, a trip to Other Music in New York City or to the new airplane-hanger sized Amoeba in Los Angeles will prove fruitful, with…

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Tonight the STRP Biennale 2015 will start in the Klokgebouw on Strijp-S in Eindhoven. The STRP biennial brings together art, technology and experimental pop culture and connects them to interested audiences. With its interactive art, light art, robotics, performances, experimental music and films, lectures and workshops STRP offers a glimpse into the near and sometimes distant future of our technology-driven culture. The topic of this edition is “SCREEN ON | NO SCREEN”:  the electronic screen. As is described on the STRP website:

.Screens are all around us, and they’re not only becoming bigger, smarter and more interactive, but also thinner, sharper and more flexible. The STRP Biennial 2015 investigates the thin line between the material and immaterial image. We show how our relation with the images that are moving all around us is getting more and more complex. It’s getting very hard to separate ourselves from them, sometimes we immerse ourselves in them, but at the same time we are getting better at controlling the images.”

 

The festival opens with a performance by Robert Henke (a.k.a Monolake, a regular participant at the STRP festival). He will show an updated version of his Lumiere audio-visual performance, simply called Lumiere II. I will be there to attend it. Four specially crafted lasers are linked to the world-famous Ableton DAW software, that was co-developed by Henke, to create animated patterns aligned to sounds with it.  The video above contains an excerpt of the original Lumiere laser performance.

Be sure to visit STRP 2015 too, if you are interested in cutting edge tech art and are near Eindhoven.

More info:

This entry is reblogged from the BA Fine Art blog. Please click on the title to read the post.

r u b y t r i c h k o v a

I am sitting in a room(1969)

This piece is of Alvin Lucier’s and is several sentences of recorded speech that are simultaneously played back into a room and re-recorded many times.
Since all rooms have their own characteristics; special sensations and formant frequencies (all of which are different depending on size); the effect is that certain frequencies are highlighted as they reverberate around the room and respond to its own frequencies. Eventually, the words become ambiguous and are replaced by the pure harmonies and tones of the room itself.
The space acts as a filter; the speech is transformed into pure sound.
The speech is repeated 32 times. The effect is hypnotic, airy, and extremely intimate in the way Lucier interacts with his environment.

I was completely astounded by how clever yet how simple this piece was. Coming from a science background, I did not realise how four walls could…

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Bryce Dessner, guitar player of  US rock band The National is currently the composer-in-residence of the Muziekgebouw in Eindhoven.

As part of the Composer in Residence series of the Muziekgebouw, a concert will be given on Thursday 07/11 by New York all-star band Bang-on-a-Can, who will be joined by special guest Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth fame.  Bang-on-a-Can All Stars have included several contemporary composed guitar pieces in their repertoire, such as the Electric Counterpoint classic of Steve Reich:

The pieces played are made by contemporary composing rock guitarists, including Fred Frith, one of my all-time favorite guitar players:

  • Bryce Dessner (The National) – Gloucester 27
  • Bryce Dessner (The National) – Shut your Eyes against the Wind
  • Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth) – Stroking Piece #1
  • Fred Frith – Snakes & Ladders
  • David Longstreth (Dirty Projectors) – Instructional Video, Matt
  • Damon, Breakfast at J&M
  • Lee Ranaldo (Sonic Youth) – How Deep are Rivers

With this program, this may be a very interesting first crossover concert of Bryce Dessner’s stay as a composer-in-residence IMHO.  So I will be there.

Check for more information:

Box” is a short promo video by a company called Bot & Dolly, a design and engineering studio from San Francisco that specializes in automation, robotics, and filmmaking.

The video explores the synthesis of real and digital space through projection-mapping on moving surfaces.

The short film documents a live performance, captured entirely in camera. Bot & Dolly produced this work to serve as both an artistic statement and technical demonstration. It is the culmination of multiple technologies, including large-scale robotics, projection mapping, and software engineering:

More information:

I first became interested in synthesizers and electronic music in the late ’70’s through the music of Pere Ubu (US) and Cabaret Voltaire (UK).  Somewhere around 79- ’80 I decided I wanted to have my own synthesizer, inspired by albums like “Dub Housing” (Pere Ubu) and “Mix Up” (Cabaret Voltaire). Especially the weird sounds created by Allen Ravenstine on Pere Ubu records motivated me to start playing synthesizer (besides guitar) . These sounds were made by a modular EML synthesizer. I couldn’t afford an EML however, so I went for the Japanese budget alternative: a semi modular Korg MS-20, which I still own and play today.

Allen Ravenstine was part of Pere Ubu until the end of the ’80s. The modular EML synthesizer remained a basic ingredient of the Pere Ubu sound up until today, played by Robert Wheeler and others. I recently stumbled upon this video of a EML synthesizer jam session by Allen Ravenstine and Robert Wheeler, apparently the first time these Pere Ubu players ever played together. The video contains some interesting  interview fragments in which Allen Ravenstine explains how the EML synthesizer became part of the unique Pere Ubu sound:

Allen Ravenstine and Robert Wheeler EML synth session.

The video fragment seems to be part of an upcoming  film about modular synthesizers and their players. This is the text accompanying the video:

In late February, 2012, former Pere Ubu synthesist Allen Ravenstine and current Pere Ubu synthesist Robert Wheeler, two legendary figures of Cleveland’s punk rock scene met at Grant Avenue Studio to discuss and demonstrate the EML modular synthesizers that have been an integral part of the Pere Ubu sound for almost 40 years. The interviews are part of the upcoming film: “I Dream of Wires: The Modular Synthesizer Documentary”.  I DREAM OF WIRES interview segments are sponsored by MATRIXSYNTH (matrixsynth.com/).


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